Massive Live Midi Sets

How I organize massive Live sets.

For what it’s worth, I’ve made at least a little progress here. I
started by dragging all of my sets into one set, keeping the order of
the tracks. Keeping the songs grouped vertically by keeping their
tracks next to each other together, I started playing with the scenes
trying to group together the best concepts within and between the
songs. That means that you end up with a sort of checkerboard of song
scenes (the chunk of scenes for each song being a sqquare), going from
the upper left to the lower right, plus some extra scenese for
meaningful transitions between songs.

I’ve got eight midi faders, so I hooked the firs one to every single
drum track, and the second one to every single bass track, the third
one to every stab track, etc. The scenes make sure that they don’t
collide with each other…

I also have started to develop my own pattern for how to use each knob
above the mixer. For example, I do a lot of LP filtering on my bass,
so i make sure that the top knob for the bass channel always does an
LP filter-ish sort of thing. The second knob on the drums always makes
the drums repeat at a higher tempo – usually by a delay. It took a
while – but I finally realized that I didn’t have to figure out how to
make each midi fader/knob channel work for one channel, but to just
connect it to every channel and make sure it basically does the same
thing for each one – just like how the strings always work the same no
matter what effect pedal is working on an electric guitar.

The most important thing to remember is that you get all of your
tracks into your set, and you still rely on setting up scenes for
defining the parts of the songs, and the transitions between the
songs. Hook each similar track to the same fader/trigger controls, and
your off. Oh – then get a faster computer…bloody dsp…


Check it…


By | 2007-04-07T10:07:00+00:00 April 7th, 2007|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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